Why Study in Study in Netherlands?

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Study in Netherlands

The Dutch system of higher education enjoys a worldwide reputation for high quality. Experience shows that people who have studied at a Dutch higher education institution perform very well in other parts of the world. This quality is achieved through a national system of regulation and quality assurance.

Holland was the first non-English-speaking country to offer courses taught in English. The Dutch higher education institutions together offer 1,560 international study programmes and courses, 1,543 of which are taught entirely in English. This makes Holland the front-runner in continental Europe.

The Dutch education system is interactive and focuses on teamwork, which makes it easy to meet other international students. Studying in Holland means developing an open mind and increasing your international orientation.

Industries & Research

The Dutch people have a history and tradition in inventing and discovery. Dutch scientists and engineers have made a remarkable contribution to human progress as a whole, from something as simple as the sawmill to microbiology and artificial organs. The Dutch contribution towards shaping of world includes Microscope, Yacht, Wind powered sawmill, Stock market, Telescope, Submarine, Pendulum clock, Electrocardiograph (ECG), Artificial kidney (Hemodialysis), Compact disc & laser disc.

The Netherlands is the 16th largest economy of the world & founding member of the European Union, the OECD and the World Trade Organization

The Netherlands has a prosperous and open economy, which depends heavily on foreign trade. The economy is noted for stable industrial relations, fairly low unemployment and inflation, a sizable current account surplus, and an important role as a European transportation hub. Industrial activity is predominantly in food processing, chemicals, petroleum refining, and electrical machinery.

Famous Ductch companies include Philips, Akzo Nobel, Royal Dutch Shell, Unilever, ING, ABN-AMRO, Fortis, KLM, Heineken and Amstel

Industries & Research

One characteristic of Dutch society is that family members are relatively independent of one another, particularly in financial terms. The elaborate national system of social welfare makes this possible. The Dutch tolerate a wide variety of lifestyles with the attitude that everyone should be able to live as they wish as long as they are not too much of a public nuisance.

Despite being basically reserved, the Dutch have a manner of speaking that may startle you with its directness. They look you straight in the eye and can sound very abrupt, especially when they are speaking English or another foreign language and cannot express all the shades of meaning they would be able to express in their own language. They do not mean to be impolite, and their habit of coming to the point quickly can actually make things easier for the foreigner.

Why study in the Netherlands

4 good reasons why to study in Netherlands
  1. Excellent education and research

    Higher education in Holland enjoys a worldwide reputation for its high quality. This is achieved through a national system of regulation and quality assurance.
    Dutch international scientific research is even placed in the very top ranks. Holland has also received international acclaim for its ground-breaking Problem-Based Learning system, which trains students to analyze and solve practical problems independently through emphasis on self-study and selfdiscipline.
    Holland was the first non-English-speaking country to offer courses taught in English. The Dutch higher education institutions together offer about 1,300 international study programmes and courses which are taught entirely in English. This makes Holland the front-runner in continental Europe.

  2. International study environment

    The Dutch education system is interactive and focuses on teamwork, which makes it easy to meet other international students. By studying in Holland you will develop an open mind and increase your international orientation.

  3. Multicultural society in the heart of Europe

    Dutch society is multicultural. Groups of people with non-Dutch backgrounds have been living in Holland for decades as a result of historical ties with other parts of the world. There is also a huge religious diversity.
    Even as far back as the early 17th century, Holland was an advanced country, with much of its wealth coming from international trade. Today, international trade is still the main engine of economic growth.
    The Dutch are accustomed to dealing with people from around the world, and above all, to working with them. Groups of people with non-Dutch backgrounds have been living in Holland for decades as a result of historical ties with other parts of the world. Although Dutch is the national language, the majority of the population speaks English and very often another foreign language, such as German or French.
    Holland lies at the point where the German, British and French cultures meet. This is evident as soon as you turn on the television. In this well-cabled country, programming from the neighbouring countries and beyond can be received in nearly every household. Cinemas show films from around the world in their original languages. Alongside the usual church towers and synagogues, the minarets of mosques can increasingly be seen in the large cities. You can dance the salsa every bit as easily as in Latin America. And Asian, Mediterranean and fast foods are becoming as familiar as wholesome Dutch fare. The result of all of this is that Holland is a place where knowledge, ideas and cultures from all over the world come together.
    Once you arrive in Holland, you’ll discover that many European capitals are within easy reach. Brussels is two hours by train, and a short flight from Amsterdam will take you to Paris, Madrid or Berlin. The Dutch universities are an ideal starting point for study tours and exchanges with other European countries.

  4. Student culture

    The higher education institutions are spread throughout the country, only some of them have campuses. The buildings of a single university might even be scattered throughout a city. Nevertheless, there certainly is a real student culture. Around each institution, a network of associations brings students together for study-related activities, sports and recreation. These associations are run by students and some are internationally oriented. Students also have their favourite pubs, restaurants and other meeting places. In general, we can say that the Dutch higher education community seeks to be part of society and not isolated from it.